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Overview

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This section covers some of the issues you might encounter while working with services and policies on the Business Services page, and how to resolve those issues.

Navigation tips for the SL1 user interface:

This section includes the following topics:

What is a Business Service?

A business service includes one or more technical services that provide value to internal or external customers. Some examples of business services include verifying Internet access or website hosting, online banking, remote backups, and remote storage. Usually a business service includes an associated Service Level Agreement (SLA) that specifies the terms of the service.

Create the following types of services on the Business Services page, in the following order:

  1. Device Service. Monitors a set of related IT infrastructure components (devices) that deliver a discrete function, such as a DNS or Collector Group, or all devices in a specific region.
  2. IT Service. Monitors a service that IT provides to your organization. An IT Service provides a way to define how a set of related Device Services work together to power a given IT service, such as a DNS plus Collector Group plus a database.
  3. Business Service. Monitors a service your organization provides to your customers. A business service consistes of one or more IT services.

The following figure shows an example of how your business services may be organized.

 

 

 

See Also

Using the Service Investigator

Creating a Business Service

Creating a Business Service From a Template

Creating a Business Service Policy

Using the Service Investigator

When you select a service from the list of services on the Business Services page, the Service Investigator page appears:

Image of the Service Investigator tab

The Tabs on the Service Investigator Page

The Service Investigator page contains three tabs:

The Info Drop-down on the Service Investigator Page

The Info drop-down at the top of the Service Investigator page displays the following: 

Click the Edit button to edit the content on all three tabs and to edit the fields on the Info drop-down. You can also edit the service name and the icon associated with the service. Click Save to save your changes.

The Constituent Services on the Service Investigator Page

The Overview tab on the Service Investigator page for a Business Service or IT Service contains a set of tiles that represent the "constituent" services that are part of the top-level service:

Image of the Service Investigator tab

Selecting the checkbox of a service tile controls which constituent service you see in the tile view below it. For example, if you have a Business Service with three IT Services, and each of those IT Services has two Device Services, selecting the checkbox of one of the IT Services will filter the Device Service tile panel down to only the Device Services that belong to the selected IT Service.

At the bottom of the Overview tab, you can review a list of devices that belong to the services you selected on the various tiles. You can then select one or more devices to see events for those devices:

Image of the Service Investigator tab

The Service Investigator page for an IT Service displays Device Services, devices, and events, while the Service Investigator page for a Device Service displays devices and events.

Viewing the Info Drop-down

On all three tabs of the Service Investigator page, you can access the Info drop-down, which displays additional information about the service that you can edit as needed, if you have permissions:

Image of the Information tab on the Service Investigator page

The Info drop-down displays the following information for the service:

The content in the Info drop-down displays many of the fields you completed when you created this service.

Click the Edit button to edit the Info drop-down, and click the Save button when you are done updating the fields.

Creating a Business Service

You can create a new business service to monitor a specific set of IT services and devices for Availability, Health, and Risk values. A good design principle is to begin with the end in mind. To create a new business service, you should first determine the following:

If you follow the design flow described above, you will have an outline of what you need to build. For example, if you provide email service, then a failure of your primary SMTP server and backup SMTP server would constitute a Critical status.

The next consideration is to determine which devices share a common description of health, availability, and risk rules. If two devices need different rules, you will need to create two Device Services.

You can copy an existing service on the Business Services page by clicking the Actions button () for that service and selecting Duplicate.

To create a Business, IT, or Device Service:

  1. On the Business Services page, click the Create Service button. The New Service page appears:

Image of the New Service page

  1. Select a service type. You should start by creating your device services, then your IT services, and then finally your business service. Your options include:

  1. Complete the remaining fields:

  1. Click the Save button. If you selected Device Service in step 2, the Devices tab appears, with a list of available devices in the Preview section. If you selected Business Service or IT Service in step 2, the Services tab appears, with a list of available services in the Preview section.

Image of the Services sub tab

  1. In the Search field, type search criteria for the services or devices you want to monitor. A list of services or devices that match your search criteria appears in the Preview section:

Image of the Services sub tab, continued

If your search for devices to be included in a Device Service exceeds 100 or the total number of defined services exceeds 100, then you must increase the Business Service default limits. For more information see, Configuring Limits for Device Services and Constituents.

: If you are looking for a very specific set of services or devices, click the gear icon () to the right of the Search field and select Advanced. In this mode, you can create an advanced search using AND or OR for multiple search criteria.

For example, to search for devices with a Device  Class of "network.router", use: deviceClass has (deviceCategory has (name contains 'network.router'))For more information, see Advanced Search.'

: If you want to search for devices that have specific custom attributes, use Advanced Search. Use the following format:

  1. When you have the right combination of services or devices, click the Save button. The default policy for the type of service you selected is automatically added to the new service.
  2. If you want to use a different business policy with the new service, see Selecting a Business Service Policy.
  3. If you want to create a new business policy to use with the new service, see Creating a Business Service Policy.
  4. Repeat this process until you have the right combination of device services and IT services in your business service (or business services, if needed).

See Also

Using the Service Investigator

Selecting a Business Service Policy

Creating a Business Service Policy

Selecting a Business Service Policy

Each service type (device service, IT service, and business service) requires a policy that determines what it monitors. A business service policy contains a set of rules and conditions that define the Availability, Health, and Risk values for the service, depending on your business needs. Each service requires that one policy be associated with a service at a time.

The Business Services PowerPack contains a set of new business service policies you can use for your services.

When you create a business service of any type, SL1 automatically uses the default policy for that particular type of business service.  You can remove the default policy after you create a new policy. The default policies cannot be edited.

If a policy contains errors, an error icon () appears next to the policy name. To view details about what makes the policy invalid, select the policy and hover over the error icon next to the policy name in the right-hand section. A pop-up window lists the problems with the policy. Note that most Status Policies will display the icon during the time between a save and the next HAR aggregation cycle. For best results, wait for the next HAR cycle before investigating whether there is a true error.

To select an existing business service policy:

  1. On the Business Services page, select the service that needs a policy. The Overview tab for the service appears.
  2. Click the Status Policy tab:

Image of the Status Policy page for Services

  1. In the Policies section on the left, select the policy you want to use.

TIP: You can type basic search criteria in the Search field to locate a specific policy in the list.

  1. To view the details of a selected policy, click the Actions button () for that policy and select Edit (or View for the default policy). The Policy Editor page appears:

Image of the Service Policy Editor page

  1. Click the Cancel button when you are done viewing the details for that policy.

You can copy an existing service policy on the Business Services page by clicking the Actions button () for that policy and selecting Duplicate.

  1. To add a policy to the service, select the policy in the Policies section and click the Use Policy button in the right-hand section. A check mark icon () appears next to that policy in the Policies section, and the words "Current Policy" replace the Use Policy button in the right-hand section.
  2. To make a copy of a policy, click the Actions button () for that policy and select Duplicate.
  3. To delete a policy you no longer want to use, click the Actions button () for that policy, select Delete, and then click Delete Policy. If that policy is used by any other services, those services are assigned the default policy type. You cannot delete a default policy.

See Also

Using the Service Investigator

Creating a Business Service

Creating a Business Service Policy

Creating a Business Service Policy

When you create a business service of any type, SL1 automatically uses the default policy for that particular type of business service. You can create a new policy to replace the default policy. When you create a new policy, the new policy uses the values from the default policy for that type of service as a starting point.

A policy includes a set of rules, and each rule can include one to three conditions. If you have multiple rules and conditions, all rules and conditions on a tab must be met to generate the Availability, Health, or Risk value. In other words, if a rule had three conditions, you would set up the conditions for that rule as an IF, AND, AND, THEN statement.

Before you configure your service policy, it is important to understand why each severity is set as a range. For example, Critical for Risk is 81-100. The range allows one rule to be more causal or important than another. For example, suppose a Device Service for Linux servers has two risk rules: one for memory utilization and one for swap utilization. A server that has exhausted memory but still has free swap space to expand into will stay running but will slow down. A server that has exhausted swap space is likely to fail. Therefore, we understand that both statuses can be bad, but the lack of free swap space is worse than having low memory. When building Risk rules, we could set 95% memory utilization as Critical with a score of 85, but set Swap at 95% utilization to Critical with a score of 95. This will indicate that swap space is more causal then memory, and that as soon as you fix the swap space issue, you will need to check into the problems with memory.

To create a policy:

  1. On the Business Services page, select the service for which you want to create a policy. The Service Investigator page appears.
  2. Click the Status Policy tab, and then click Create Policy in the Policies section. A Create Policy window appears.
  3. Type a policy name and click Create Policy. The new policy is added to the Policies section on the Status Policy tab.

  1. Click the Actions button () for the new policy and select Edit, or click the Edit Policy button. The Service Policy Editor page appears, with a default rule already configured on each tab for Availability, Health, and Risk:

Image of Status Policy Editor for Services

  1. On the Availability, Health, and Risk tabs, edit the rules and conditions for each of the three values that make up this policy. Each tab uses the same layout.

    Availability is not populated for component devices. Therefore, Availability will have a null value for any Device Service that includes component devices. The null value is displayed as a hyphen. A solution is to change the rule from Availability to Count, because Count only considers devices that are shown to be available from a collection perspective.

  1. In the Services or Devices drop-down list, select one of the following options to filter the services for this policy, as needed:

  1. To update an Availability, Health, or Risk value for a rule, edit the value in the SET <VALUE> TO column:

Image of the Edit Rule fields

  1. To edit the default conditions for an existing rule, click the Edit button for that rule. The Edit Condition window appears:

Image of the Edit Condition window

  1. Complete the following fields:

  1. In the Set Threshold section, click and drag the slider to specify a threshold for this condition. A small Threshold window appears, where you can specify the following threshold details:

Image of the Edit Condition window with slider

If the line below the number in the Threshold window is red, then your current threshold is invalid. Click the icons or adjust the slider to make sure the line is not red under the threshold value.

  1. To save the conditions and threshold settings and close the Edit Condition window, click the Save button.
  2. To add more conditions to a rule, click Edit on the Service Policy Editor page and follow the instructions in steps 8-11.

To remove a condition from a rule, click the Actions button () for that condition and select Delete. To copy a condition, click the Options button () for that condition and select Duplicate.

  1. If you have more than one rule, select the type of aggregation you want to use in the Use <type> of rules field. You can choose to use the minimum, maximum, or average value for the rules.

NOTE: The Availability value calculates only the minimum and maximum values for rules.

  1. Edit any additional conditions or rules on the remaining tabs for this policy, and then click the Save Policy button.

See Also

Using the Service Investigator

Creating a Business Service

Selecting a Business Service Policy

Assigning Icons to a Business Service

To assign an icon to a service:

  1. On the Business Services page, locate the service to which you want to add an icon.
  2. Click the Actions button () for that service and select Assign Icon. The Select an Icon window appears:

Image of the Select an Icon window

  1. To use an existing icon, select that icon from the list of icons and click the Select Icon button.

If an icon includes a tag, you can search for that icon by typing some or all of the tag text in the Search field.

  1. To upload an icon from your local drive, make sure that the image file meets the following criteria:

  1. To start the upload process, click the Add Icon button. The Add an Icon window appears:

Image of the Add an Icon window

  1. In the Icon name field, type a name for the icon you want to upload.
  2. In the Add Tags field, type a short descriptor for the icon, without spaces. You can use this tag for searching later.
  3. You can click the Browse or Drop area to browse for and select the icon, or you can drag and drop the icon file onto the Add an Icon window.
  4. Click the Add Icon button. The icon is added to the Select an Icon window.
  5. Click the Select Icon button to add the icon to the service.

Creating a Business Service Template

You can create a service template from an existing service to simplify the process of replicating an entire service or service hierarchy on another SL1 system. For example, if you want to create the same service hierarchy, but only change the owner of the service hierarchy, creating a service template from an existing service streamlines this process.

To create a service template:

  1. On the Business Services page, click the Actions button () for the service you want to use as the basis for your template and select Create Template. The Create Template From Service window appears:

  1. This window contains important information about what you can and cannot do with a service template. After reading this information, click Next. The next Create Template From Service window appears:

  1. Type a name for the template in the Template Name field, and type a description of the template in the Description field, if needed. Click Next. The next Create Template From Service window appears:

  1. The left side of the window displays the tree for the service hierarchy that is being made into a template. You can select each service in the tree to see information related to that service on the right side of the window. For example, if you select a device service, the Devices tab displays the search query used for the devices included in that service. If you select a business service or an IT service, the Services tab displays the search query for that service. Note the following about the Dynamic? slider.

  1. Click the Status Policy tab to view the status policy definition for Availability, Health and Risk for that service.
  2. On the Status Policy tab for a device service, you can add annotations for the policies in the template. When a new user uses the template on another system, your annotations can help that user understand the purpose of this status policy.

  1. To leave an annotation for a status policy or rule, click the talk bubble icon () next to the rule or tab. Type your annotation text in the Annotation window and click Save. The talk bubble icon now displays as solid blue, while empty talk bubble icons contain a plus sign.

  1. Click Create Template. A confirmation window appears stating that you created the template. Click Close. The template appears on the Service Templates page (Business Services > Templates).

Creating a Business Service From a Template

To create a service from a template:

  1. Go to the Service Templates page (Business Services > Templates) and click the Actions button () for the template you want to use and select Create Service. The Create Service from Template window appears:

You can also go to the Business Services page, click the down arrow on the Create Service button, and select Create Service from Template.

  1. Select a template and click Next. The next Create Service from Template window appears:

  1. Select an organization from the What organization manages this service? drop-down list and click Next. The next Create Service from Template window appears:

  1. To edit the names of the services in the hierarchy at the left, click the service name and update the name. Updating the service names is recommended if you are creating the new service on the same system from which the template was created.
  2. Any annotations for a device service that were added when the template was created will be present, and you can edit them and add new annotations.
  3. You can edit the rules for Availability, Health, and Risk for a device service in the template.

  1. To edit a rule, click the gray pencil icon () next to the rule, and an edit window appears where you can update the rule:

  1. Click the Save button to close the edit window.
  2. Click the Create Service from Template button to save your service. A confirmation window appears:

  1. Click the Close button. The new services appear on the Business Services page.

Exporting a Service Template

If you want to use a business service template on another SL1 system, you can package that template into a PowerPack and export it to the other system.

To package and export a service template:

  1. Go to The PowerPack Manager page (System > Manage > PowerPacks).
  2. Click the Actions button and select Create a New PowerPack.

  1. On the PowerPack Properties page, type a name for the PowerPack in the Name field and click Save.

  1. Select AP Content Objects from the left-nav on the PowerPack Properties page. Your template appears in the Available AP Content Objects pane:

  1. Click the lightning bolt icon () next to the template to add it to the PowerPack. The template moves up to the Embedded AP Content Objects pane:

  1. Select Build/Export from the left-nav to open the Compiled PowerPacks window, and then click the Create a new build link:

  1. In the Configure New Export File window, select Administrative (including export & license) from the Embedded license key drop-down list. Click Build.

  1. When the PowerPack finishes building, you can download the build with the download icon () and use that file to upload the template to a new SL1 system.

Installing a Template from a PowerPack

Default Service Policy Settings

The following sections describe how the three default service policies calculate Availability, Health, and Risk:

Device Service Default Policy

Availability: Maximum available: if one device is available, then all are available

Health: Based upon the worst device severity, then uses the following settings:

Risk: Based upon the worst device severity, then uses the following percentages:

IT Service Default Policy

Availability: Maximum available: if one service is available, then all are available

Health: Average Health value of all services

Risk: Maximum Risk value of any service

Business Service Default Policy

Availability: Maximum available : if one service is available, then all are available

Health: Average Health value of all services

Risk: Maximum Risk value of any service

Managing Events for Business Services

When SL1 evaluates the state of a service, it reviews the Health, Availability, and Risk values produced by your business services, IT services, and devices services. SL1 then compares those values against the alert thresholds that are defined on the Business Service Thresholds page (Business Services > Thresholds):

Image of the Business Services Thresholds tab

If any of the thresholds on the the Business Service Thresholds page are crossed, SL1 generates an alert message. For an event to be produced, you need to create or install an event policy that watches for that alert message and produces an event when it sees that alert message.

To update the thresholds on this tab, click the Edit button, select which thresholds should generate an alert message, and then click Save.

By monitoring the events tied to your business services, you can act quickly if one of your services is unavailable, unhealthy, or potentially at risk.

See Also

Using the Service Investigator

Creating a Business Service

Creating a Business Service Policy

Exporting Service Data with the ScienceLogic API

By navigating to the GraphiQL interface, you can export business service data with the ScienceLogic API. GraphiQL is a user interface for interactively exploring the capabilities of, and executing queries against, a GraphQL API.

To access the GraphiQL interface:

  1. In a browser, type the URL or IP address for SL1.
  2. Type /gql at the end of the URL or IP address. For example, you could type https://sl1.sciencelogic.com/gql. The GraphiQL interface appears:

Image of the GraphiQL interface page

  1. In SL1, make a note of the URL that displays for the service you want to export. For example, if you have a service named "East Coast Tech," and its URL in SL1 is http://sl1.sciencelogic.com/inventory/services/cjumt2se20p3izg6lmiqool5b/overview. Make a note of the unique value between /services and /overview. In this example, the value you need is cjumt2se20p3izg6lmiqool5b.

  1. In the GraphiQL interface, create a harProvider query for the service you want to export, using the following format:

query {harProvider (id:"<Service_URI>") { name} }

 

  1. Click the Execute Query (Play) button to tell GraphiQL to send the query to the GraphQL server and get the results. Using the example service from step 3, the query and its data appear in the following format:

Image of the GraphiQL query page

  1. To export additional data, use the filter-while-you-type capabilities of the GraphiQL interface to gather other information, such as the collection timestamp, health, availability, and risk:

Image of the GraphiQL query page

  1. After you finish updating your query, click the Execute Query button.

Image of the GraphiQL query page

  1. To return to the SL1 user interface, replace the "gql" and any text after it in the URL with "ap2", such as https://sl1.sciencelogic.com/ap2.

For more information about GraphQL and the GraphiQL user interface, see the ScienceLogic GraphQL API Quick Start Guide.

Troubleshooting Services

This section covers some of the issues you might encounter while working with services and policies on the Business Services page, and how to resolve those issues.

Some of my services are not generating Health, Availability, or Risk values

In this situation, some services in SL1 do not generate any values for Health, Availability, or Risk. For example, a dash might appear instead of a value in the Status table on the Service Investigator page:

Image of the Service Status table

To address this issue, review the following settings and suggestions:

Step 1: Confirm you have the latest code for the new user interface:

  1. Navigate to the Content Management page (Manage > Content Management).
  2. Click the Install/Upgrade Packages button. The Install Packages page appears.
  3. If needed, upgrade to the latest version of @sciencelogic/ap2 to potentially resolve any issues that might have caused this issue.

  1. For example, in the following image, the installed version of @sciencelogic/ap2 is 5.38.4, while the latest version is 5.39.0:

Image of the AP2 Upgrade page

Step 2: Turn up the log level to trace:

  1. Either go to the console of the SL1 server or use SSH to access the SL1 appliance.
  2. Log in as user em7admin.
  3. Open the file /usr/local/silo/nextui/nextui.env with vi or another text editor:

sudo vi /usr/local/silo/nextui/nextui.env

 

  1. Change the log setting to the following: NEXT_UI_LOG_LEVEL=all:trace
  2. Restart SL1 and GraphQL with the following command:

sudo systemctl restart nextui

 

  1. Tail the log with the following command:

sudo journalctl -u nextui -f

 

Step 3: Ensure that your service policy is valid:

  1. In SL1, navigate to your service on theBusiness Services page.
  2. Review the policy used by that service for any validation errors, as in the following example:

Image of a Service Policy error

  1. Address any errors in the service policy.

Step 4: Ensure that your service contains at least one service or device:

  1. Navigate to the Business Services page.
  2. Navigate to the Devices or Services tab for the service or services that are not displaying values.

Image of an empty Device Policy

  1. Ensure that at least one device or service appears in the Preview section. If not, create a new search for devices or services.

Step 5: Ensure that your service policy rules contain at least one service or device:

  1. Rule filters select a subset of the devices or services defined by the service filter. If a device service filter results in five devices, the rule filter selects some subset of those five devices. You might create rule filters that exclude all devices or services in the service, resulting in no metric values.
  2. The following rule filter only selects the devices with a state of 4, or Critical. If no devices have a state of 4, the resulting list of devices for that filter will be empty, and you cannot get any device metric values:

Image of a Device Policy

  1. In this case, we are counting devices, so the count is zero and produces a value based in the condition table.
  2. If the metric had been a normal device metric like latency, the result would have been "null," because getting the average latency from zero devices results in null.

Step 6: Generate audit data by running onDemandProcessing with the GraphiQL interface:

  1. In a browser, type the URL or IP address for the new user interface, and then type /gql at the end of the URL or IP address. The GraphiQL interface appears.
  2. On the left side of the GraphiQL editor, type the following query:

query onDemand {

harProviderOnDemandProcessing(ids: []) {

results { serviceId timestamp health availability risk }

auditHistory { serviceId ruleSetId ruleId timestamp sequence message }

}

}

 

  1. Click the Execute Query (Play) button to tell GraphiQL to send the query to the GraphQL server and get the results:

Image of a GraphiQL Query

  1. Review the resulting audit information on the right side of the GraphiQL editor:
  2. If you know the service ID you are looking for, search for it by clicking inside the right pane and typing cmd+f. The GraphiQL interface highlights the services that match the ID you looked for:

Image of the highlighted results of a GraphiQL Query

  1. Scroll down to see the audit information for this service (look for the highlighted information):

Image of highlighted audit results

  1. After running onDemandProcessing with the GraphiQL interface and updating the log settings on the server to do all:trace, you can now see trace-level log messages in the terminal where you ran sudo journalctl -u nextui -f.

  1. Review the log messages for errors and warnings:

Image of Log Errors and Warnings

My services are not generating Health, Availability, and Risk values

In this situation, all of your services in SL1 fail to generate any values for Health, Availability, or Risk.

To address this issue, review the following settings and suggestions.

Step 1: Confirm that the Business Services process exists:

  1. Go to the Process Manager page (System > Settings > Admin Processes) and start typing "Business" in the Process Name filter:

Image of the Process Manager page

Step 2: Follow the steps in Generate audit data using the GraphiQL user interface, above. If the process times out, then the processing has taken more than two minutes to complete, and no computed results are stored.

Step 3: Look for logs from the python process:

  1. The python process calls the onDemandProcessing GraphQL query. If python is having trouble connecting to GraphQL, it could be an authentication problem or some other code-related issue.
  2. Look in /var/log/em7 for newly created logs, and ls -lrt to see if any new error logs were created with "business" in the file name.
  3. Also check the silo.log for messages related to the business_service_management process:

grep service /var/log/em7/silo.log

503 errors, or Health, Availability, and Risk values that are all the same or inaccurate

In this situation, you might see 503 errors in logs or in the user interface. You might also see Health, Availability, and Risk values that are all the same or inaccurate.

To address this issue:

  1. Confirm that the nginx config file has the limit_conn perip value set to 200 instead of 20:

sudo vi /etc/nginx/conf.d/em7_limits.conf

 

  1. If needed, update the line to say:

limit_conn perip 200;

 

  1. Run the following command:

sudo systemctl restart nginx